Spring 2019: Drop-in Qi Gong and Mindfulness

WHAT: Free Drop-in practice of mindfulness and qi gong (facilitator: K.Yep)

WHEN: 12:30 – 1 p.m., 1st and 3rd Tuesdays, starting February 2019

WHAT IS HEALING JUSTICE? “Conscious of systemic suffering and injustices, we work to create a more just, peaceful, and sustainable world. We promise, for the benefit of all, to practice self-care, mindfulness, healing, and joy. We vow to not burn out.” (Mushim Patricia Ikeda 2016)

WHO: Free and open to the public, no experience necessary.

WHERE:
Room 208 of Gold Student Center, Pitzer
https://mypz.pitzer.edu/netcommunity/view.image?Id=1148

WHAT TO BRING:
1. Intercultural understanding frame
2. Water
3. Compassion
4. Comfortable shoes

Scholarship suggests that mindfulness:
* Decreases stress (Shapiro et. al. 2005; Zeidan et. al. 2011)
* Impacts the brain (Davidson et. al. 2003; Luders et.al. 2009)
* Impacts implicit bias or compassion (Burgess et. al. 2017; Jazaleri, et. al. 2012; Leuke & Gibson 2015; Tincher et. al. 2016)
*Impacts immune markers (Hazel 2011; Jacobs et. al. 2011; Morgan et. al. 2014)
* Impacts executive functions (Teper et. al. 2013)

“Oppression(s) do not operate on merely an intellectual level. It is painful and embodied. Conversations about oppressions are hard, if they are real. We must unlearn internalized oppression(s) at the very cells of our being. While we condemn oppression(s), we do violence to ourselves and others if we don’t bring compassion to our experience. Mindfulness teaches us compassion for self and others.” (Beth Berila 2016)

FMI: www. kathyyep..com

10/13/19: Transformational Relationships

WHAT: Transformational Relationships with Institute for Social Transformation

No-cost to PZ participants. Breakfast and lunch provided.

WHO: Open to Pitzer College faculty, staff, students, and community partners.

WHEN: 8:00 a.m. – 5 p.m. (to be confirmed)

WHERE: Multipurpose Room, Gold Student Center, Pitzer College (to be confirmed)

We appreciate your interest. Please note that filling out the survey does not guarantee a spot in the workshop. We are taking into consideration representation from different sectors of the campus and attendance at previous events for the 50 spots. We hope to continue to provide more programming to support your interest in professional development opportunities like these.

Kindly, RSVP by 9/25/18

FMI: Dr. Kathy Yep, Associate Dean of Faculty, Kathleen_yep@pitzer.edu

SPONSORED BY: Diversity Committee, Campus Life Committee, and Office of the Dean of Faculty

RECOMMENDED READINGS: The following readings are recommended (but not required) before the daylong workshop:

* WEISSGLASS, CONSTRUCTIVIST LISTENING:
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Julian_Weissglass/publication/249053633_Constructivist_Listening_for_Empowerment_and_Change/links/551c79b50cf20d5fbde54168/Constructivist-Listening-for-Empowerment-and-Change.pdf

http://schoolreforminitiative.org/doc/dyad.pdf

* PERRY: https://ii.library.jhu.edu/2013/12/13/perrys-scheme-understanding-the-intellectual-development-of-college-age-students/

12/9/18 Festival of Lights vigil outside of Adelanto Immigration Detention Center

“If the goal was to increase the love, rather than winning or dominating a constant opponent, I think we could actually imagine liberation from constant oppression. We would suddenly be seeing everything we do, everyone we meet, not through the tactical eyes of war, but through eyes of love. We would see that there’s no such thing as a blank canvas, an empty land or a new idea – but everywhere there is complex, ancient, fertile ground full of potential.” (adrienne marie brown)

The Pitzer College Diversity Committee invites you to an interfaith vigil near an immigration detention center that is 90 miles away from Pitzer College. Chanukah, the Festival of Lights, is a Jewish festival that celebrates freedom of religion and freedom from tyranny. People celebrate Hanukkah by lighting candles on a menorah, which is also called a Hanukiyah. Community members will gather near the immigrant detention facility to shine light on shared humanity. This facility is the largest immigrant detention center in California. It detains immigrants and refugees from Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America.

At PZ, 1000 cranes were folded for a student-led 11/15 solidarity ceremony around a range of social issues. These cranes will be presented at the Festival of Lights vigil on 12/9.
Free transportation is available. The first 20 – 30 people to sign up via this survey will receive a spot. All are welcome (students, staff, faculty, and community members).

DEPART FROM PZ: 2 p.m.: A bus will be leaving from Pitzer in front of Scott Hall. Go to Rancho Cucamonga to pick up community partners then to Adelanto.
CEREMONY: 5:30 p.m.: The ceremony across the street from Adelanto immigration detention center.
RETURN TO PZ: 9:30 p.m.: The bus will go to Rancho Cucamonga to drop off community partners then return to Pitzer College in front of Scott Hall.

LOGISTICS: There are no bathrooms at the site. Dress warmly and wear sturdy/close toed shoes. Bring flashlight, water, and snacks.

OPTIONAL: glow in the dark signs with wishes and hopes, poetry, songs, chairs, glow sticks, blankets to sit on, xmas lights with own power source, musical instruments, speakers with own power source, noisemakers, Kleenex.

BACKGROUND INFO ON IMMIGRATION DETENTION CENTERS : (content warning)

https://widerimage.reuters.com/story/inside-californias-largest-immigration-detention-center

https://www.thedailybeast.com/trans-woman-roxsana-hernandez-rodriguez-beaten-in-ice-custody-before-death-pathologist-finds?fbclid=IwAR0PqnkS1cK44CvKUWJTzlIzzeBK24l1gns-cl0BbcsitJlxkfL_EXIDuzI&source=facebook&via=desktop

http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-adelanto-oig-20181002-story.html

https://www.migrationpolicy.org/article/profiting-enforcement-role-private-prisons-us-immigration-detention

https://boomcalifornia.com/2017/12/25/black-life-in-adelanto/

https://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-indian-immigrants-20180813-story.html

CO-SPONSORS of PZ BUS:
PZ Diversity Committee
ASAM102: Social Responsibility Praxis (Yep)
ASAM22: Healing Justice (Yep)

EVENT SPONSORS: Rabbi Suzanne Singer (Riverside), Bend the Arc (LA), Clue CA (LA), Interfaith Movement for Human Integrity (Riverside), and more…

Fall 2018 – Drop-in Qi Gong and Mindfulness

WHAT: Free Drop-in practice of mindfulness and qi gong (facilitator: K.Yep)

WHEN: 12:30 – 1 p.m., 1st and 3rd Tuesdays

WHAT IS HEALING JUSTICE? “Conscious of systemic suffering and injustices, we work to create a more just, peaceful, and sustainable world. We promise, for the benefit of all, to practice self-care, mindfulness, healing, and joy. We vow to not burn out.” (Mushim Patricia Ikeda 2016)

WHO: Free and open to the public, no experience necessary.

WHERE:
Room 208 of Gold Student Center, Pitzer
https://mypz.pitzer.edu/netcommunity/view.image?Id=1148

WHAT TO BRING:
1. Intercultural understanding frame
2. Water
3. Compassion
4. Comfortable shoes

Scholarship suggests that mindfulness:
* Decreases stress (Shapiro et. al. 2005; Zeidan et. al. 2011)
* Impacts the brain (Davidson et. al. 2003; Luders et.al. 2009)
* Impacts implicit bias or compassion (Burgess et. al. 2017; Jazaleri, et. al. 2012; Leuke & Gibson 2015; Tincher et. al. 2016)
*Impacts immune markers (Hazel 2011; Jacobs et. al. 2011; Morgan et. al. 2014)
* Impacts executive functions (Teper et. al. 2013)

“Oppression(s) do not operate on merely an intellectual level. It is painful and embodied. Conversations about oppressions are hard, if they are real. We must unlearn internalized oppression(s) at the very cells of our being. While we condemn oppression(s), we do violence to ourselves and others if we don’t bring compassion to our experience. Mindfulness teaches us compassion for self and others.” (Beth Berila 2016)

FMI: www. kathyyep..com

Free Mindfulness Workshops, Summer 2018

WHAT: Free drop-in practice of mindfulness and qi gong

WHEN: 12:30 – 1 p.m., 1st and 3rd Tuesdays

WHO: Free and open to the public, no experience necessary.

WHERE:
Living Room, McConnell, Pitzer College (Bdlg 9 on map)

Free parking: Visitor Spots in Holden and East Mesa Parking (15 and 16 on map)

Campus Map:
https://mypz.pitzer.edu/netcommunity/view.image?Id=1148

 

WHAT TO BRING:
1. Intercultural understanding frame
2. Water
3. Compassion
4. Comfortable shoes

Scholarship suggests that mindfulness:
*Impacts immune markers (Hazel 2011; Jacobs et. al. 2011; Morgan et. al. 2014)
* Impacts executive functions (Teper et. al. 2013)

* Decreases stress (Krasner et al., 2009) or pain (Zeidan et. al. 2011)

* Impacts the brain (Davidson et. al. 2003; Luders et.al. 2009)

* Impacts compassion (Jazaleri, et. al. 2012; Neff and Germer 2013)

* Impacts implicit bias (Burgess et. al. 2017; Kang, Gray, & Dovidio, 2014; Leuke & Gibson 2015; Tincher et. al. 2016)

WHAT IS MINDFULNESS?

“Mindfulness is when you are truly there, mind and body together. You breathe in and out mindfully, you bring your mind back to your body, and you are there. When your mind is there with your body, you are established in the present moment. Then you can recognize the many conditions of happiness that are in you and around you, and happiness just comes naturally. ” (Thich Nhat Hanh)

“Conscious of systemic suffering and injustices, we work to create a more just, peaceful, and sustainable world. We promise, for the benefit of all, to practice self-care, mindfulness, healing, and joy. We vow to not burn out.” (Mushim Patricia Ikeda 2016)

“Oppression(s) do not operate on merely an intellectual level. It is painful and embodied. Conversations about oppressions are hard, if they are real. We must unlearn internalized oppression(s) at the very cells of our being. While we condemn oppression(s), we do violence to ourselves and others if we don’t bring compassion to our experience. Mindfulness teaches us compassion for self and others.” (Beth Berila 2016)

“I think our notions of what counts as radical have changed over time. And I think that now we’re thinking deeply about the connection between interior life and what happens in the social world. We have to imagine the kind of society we want to inhabit. We can’t simply assume that somehow, magically, we’re going to create a new society in which there will be new human beings. No, we have to begin that process of creating the society we want to inhabit right now.” (Angela Davis in conversation with Fania Davis, 2016)

“Reconciliation is increasingly understood as an umbrella-term for an overall process which includes the search for truth, justice and forgiveness with the past is necessary for successful transitions from conflict, resentment and tension to peace and connectedness. …Whereas the role of courts is to judge the guilt or innocence of the alleged perpetrator, the focus of truth commissions is placed on the victims and their individual experiences.” (ICRC)

“If we want to grow as teachers — we must do something alien to academic culture: we must talk to each other about our inner lives — risky stuff in a profession that fears the personal and seeks safety in the technical, the distant, the abstract.”

Parker J. Palmer, The Courage to Teach: Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teacher′s Life

Free Mindfulness Workshops: Fall 2017 Semester

WHAT: Free Mindfulness Workshops: Drop-in practice of qi gong and walking mindfulness

WHO: Free and open to the public, no experience necessary.

WHEN: Thursdays, 12:30 p.m. – 1 p.m.

WHERE: Under the trees in front of Scott Hall (near Mills Ave) Pitzer College, Claremont, CA

Free Parking: Visitors Spot – East Mesa Parking Lot

WHAT TO BRING:
1. Bring intercultural understanding and social responsibility frame (vs. cultural appropriation)
2. Water
3. Compassion
4. Comfortable shoes

WHAT IS MINDFULNESS? Conscious of systemic suffering and injustices, we aim to practice loving-kindness mindfulness in a way that creates a more just, peaceful, and sustainable world and does not cause harm to others.

“Oppression(s) do not operate on merely an intellectual level. It is painful and embodied.  We must unlearn internalized oppression(s) at the very cells of our being. While we condemn oppression(s), we do violence to ourselves and others if we don’t bring compassion to our experience. Mindfulness teaches us compassion for self and others.” B. Berila

Scholarship suggests that mindfulness/meditation:
– decreases pain and stress (Shapiro et. al. 2005; Zeidan et. al. 2011)
– changes our brains (Davidson et. al. 2003; Luders et.al. 2009)
– enhances compassion (Jazaleri, et. al. 2012)

-potentially reduces implicit bias towards a targeted group (Stell & Farsides, 2016)

 

Free mindfulness workshops start Fri 9/16/16

WHAT:  Free Mindfulness Workshops:  Drop-in practice of qi gong and mindfulness

Facilitated by Prof. Kathy Yep and students from ASAM94:Community Health and ASAM115: Methodologies

WHAT IS MINDFULNESS ?  Conscious of systemic suffering and injustices, we aim to practice mindfulness in ways that create a more just, peaceful, and sustainable world and does not cause harm to others. (M.P. Ikeda)

ANGELA DAVIS (2016): “I think our notions of what counts as radical have changed over time. Self-care and healing and attention to the body and the spiritual dimension—all of this is now a part of radical social justice struggles. That wasn’t the case before. …Even those who are fighting against state violence often incorporate impulses that are based on state violence in their relations with other people.”

MUSHIM PATRICIA IKEDA (2016): “Here in Oakland (California) I don’t think it’s melodramatic or inaccurate to say that we now live in the midst of multiple ongoing crises. … Perhaps your community, like mine, is in need of inventive ways to carve out spaces for what some are now calling “radical rest.”… We need to build this new “woke” way of living together—how it functions, handles conflict, makes decisions, eats and loves, grieves and plays. And we can’t do that by burning out.”

WHO:  Open to the public, no experience necessary.

WHEN & WHERE:  Eight Fridays, 12:10 p.m. – 12:45 p.m.

9/16, 9/23, 9/30, 11/11, 12/2, 12/9  (Broad Performance Space in Broad Center, Pitzer College)  (Bdlg #1 on the map)

10/7, 10/28 (on the field near the Clock Tower, Pitzer College)

Pitzer College Campus Map: http://mypz.pitzer.edu/netcommunity/Page.aspx?pid=513

Free Parking: Visitor Spots in East Mesa Parking Lot

WHAT TO BRING:

  1. Intercultural understanding frame (vs. cultural appropriation).
  2. Water
  3. Compassion
  4. Comfortable shoes

Sponsored by: Asian American Studies 94:Community Health and  Asian American Studies 115: Methodologies

Mindfulness in Plum Village Tradition:

Dr. Yep has practiced mindfulness in Thich Nhat Hanhʻs Plum Village tradition since 1996. Zen Master Thich Nhat Hanh (pronounced tik-not-hawn) is a global spiritual leader, poet and peace activist, revered throughout the world for his teachings and bestselling writings on mindfulness and peace. He has survived three wars, persecution, and more than thirty years of exile from his native Vietnam, when he was banned by both the non-Communist and Communist governments for his role in undermining the violence he saw affecting his people. Thich Nhat Hanh has built a thriving community of over 600 monks and nuns worldwide, who, together with his tens of thousands of lay students, apply his teachings on mindfulness, peace-making and community-building in schools, workplaces, prisons – throughout the world. More information can be found at PlumVillage.org.

Qi Gong (pronounced chee-gong): Dr. Yep was trained by Master Paul Li and Dr. Bingkun Hu starting in 1994. Practicing for over twenty years, she has facilitated small qi gong groups in California. Dayan (Wild Goose) Qigong is a Chinese movement form that was first developed by the Taoist Monk, Dao An, about 1700 years ago. Dayan means “wild goose” and Qigong means “mastery of chi.” (or vital life energy). Dayan Qigong was passed down as a secret doctrine for 27 generations until the last lineage holder, Grandmaster Yang Meijun, began teaching the Chinese public the form in 1975.